Thursday, October 23, 2014

Sapper Edgar Boucher - Remuera Memorial

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 New Zealand Herald, Volume LV, Issue 16848, 13 May 1918

Sapper Edgar Boucher born in Tauranga was the eldest son of Ernest and Anna Boucher and was educated at Kings College, he was also a member of the College Rifles.  At the outbreak of war in August 1914 he was employed as an assistant surveyor by Thomas McFarlane in Victoria Arcade, Auckland. He quickly volunteered his services leaving with the Samoan Advance Party on 15 August 1914 attached to the Signal Company.  Some months after arriving in Samoa he secured a position with the Goverment Survey Department as an assistant surveyor in January 1915.  Later when the call went up for volunteers for Gallipoli he returned to New Zealand and re-enlisted in October 1915 embarking with the 9th Reinforcements, New Zealand Engineers on 8 January 1916.

After Gallipoli in France, Edgar was wounded in the left leg on 25 July 1916 returning to his unit on 29 September 1916 once recovered.

On 12 October 1917 Edgar was laying cable under heavy shellfire at Passchendaele.  Like many other New Zealand men at the end of the battle he was missing.  A court of enquiry was held to determine his status in May 1918 which concluded he was killed in action.  One of the soldiers to give evidence at his enquiry was Sapper Norman H. McKenzie below is part of his statement taken from Boucher's military record:

"The last time I saw Sapper Boucher was when he was taking shelter from the shelling near Fleet cottage...I saw him crawl out of sight and if he remained he was certainly killed as the shelling was intense"





http://muse.aucklandmuseum.com/databases/Cenotaph/38834.detail?Ordinal=2&c_surname_search=boucher&c_warconflict_search=%22world+war+i,+1914-1918%22

Edgar was 24 years old and is remember on the Tyne Cot Memorial, Tyne Cot Cemetery, Zonnebeke, West-Vlaanderen, Belgium with the many other New Zealander's who went missing on that fateful day.  

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Tuesday, October 21, 2014

Lieutenant William Archibald Buchanan - Remuera memorial, Auckland


 

William Buchanan was the only son of Archibald and Edith Buchanan of 27 Victoria Avenue, Remuera.  He was educated briefly at Clifton College, Bristol and then at Kings College, Auckland.  After school he headed to Sandhurst intent on a career in the Indian Army.  While there war broke out and William enlisted with the Connaught Rangers keen to do his bit and embarked for the war in France where he was badly wounded on 25 April 1915. He was then declared medically unfit for service however after recovering he was accepted into the Royal Flying Corps and obtained his pilot's licence on a Maurice Farman Biplane on 14 April 1916 he was only 21 years old. 

A few weeks before his 22nd birthday he was killed on active service as a result of a flying accident,  He is buried in Tidworth Military Cemetery, Wiltshire. 

Thursday, October 16, 2014

Main Body sails 16 October 1914 - 100 years ago today.

One hundred years ago today the Main Body of the New Zealand Expeditionary force embarked on its journey to the battlefields of WW1.

Aboard 10 troopships were Major-General Sir Alexander Godley the commander of the force, 8,454 soldiers, 3,815 horses and one woman Louisa Godley (wife of Major- General Sir Godley).  The force departed Kings Wharf, Wellington the largest body of men ever to leave the shores of New Zealand at any one time.

Most on board were expecting to go to England and then onto the war in France, however after the Ottoman Empire entered the war in October 1914 and the New Zealander's together with 27 Australian troopships with whom they had joined were diverted to Egypt arriving on 3 December 1914.

For many on board it was the first time they had left the shores of New Zealand in their minds they had likely conjured up the image of a great adventure, fighting for King and country in foreign lands.  None could have foreseen the horrors that they would experience over the next four years.  Some would never return and those that did were often never the same again.

Of the 40 men remembered on the Hunterville, Whanganui memorial 14 of them sailed with the Main Body on 16 October 1914.  Little did they know as they left New Zealand it would be for the last time.  Below is a small tribute to those 14 men:

Edward Rippon Armstrong - 11/1

 
Embarked 16 October 1914, Wellington Mounted Rifles
Killed in Action at Gallipoli on 9 August, aged 23.
Remembered on the Chunuk Bair (New Zealand) Memorial, Chunuk Bair Cemetery, Gallipoli, Turkey.

Thomas George Ball - 11/137 / 11/187


 Embarked 16 October 1914, Wellington Mounted Rifles
Killed in Action at Gallipoli on 9 August, aged 25.
Buried at Baby 700 Cemetery, Anzac, Turkey.

Melville James Bull - 11/14

 

Embarked 16 October 1914, Wellington Mounted Rifles
Killed in Action at Gallipoli on 9 August, aged 21.
Remembered on the Chunuk Bair (New Zealand) Memorial, Chunuk Bair Cemetery, Gallipoli, Turkey. 

Charles John Canton - 2/299

 

Embarked 16 October 1914, Field Artillery
Killed in Action, 19 May 1915 at Gallipoli
Buried at Walker's Ridge Cemetery, Anzac, Turkey.

Robert Guy Chamberlin - 11/23

 

Embarked 16 October 1914, Wellington Mounted Rifles
Killed in Action at Gallipoli on 6 August, aged 21.
Remembered at No. 2 Outpost Cemetery, Turkey.

William Dawbin - 11/41
Embarked 16 October 1914, Wellington Mounted Rifles
Died of Wounds received at Gallipoli, 22 August 1915
Buried Compton Dundon (St. Andrew) Churchyard Extension, Somerset, England.


Claude Victor Adrian Meads - 11/105
Embarked 16 October 1914, Wellington Mounted Rifles
Killed in Action at Gallipoli, 6 September 1915
He is remember at Embarkation Pier Cemetery, Turkey

Glen Urquhart Mclean - 11/103
Embarked 16 October 1914, Wellington Mounted Rifles 
Died of wounds received at Gallipoli, 13 August 1915 at sea.
Aged 22 
Buried at East Mudros Military Cemetery, Lemnos, Greece 

Hugh Graham Pringle - 11/116
Embarked 16 October 1914, Wellington Mounted Rifles
Killed in Action at Gallipoli, 9 August 1915, aged 26
Remembered on Chunuk Bair (New Zealand) Memorial, Chunuk Bair Cemetery, Gallipoli, Turkey


Frank Jennings Rule - 10/502
Embarked 16 October 1914, Wellington Infantry Battalion
Died of wounds received at Gallipoli, 26 May 1915
Buried at Alexandria (Chatby) Military and War Memorial Cemetery, Egypt
Charles Bruce Stuart-Menteath -10/1082  Embarked 16 October 1914, Wellington Infantry Battalion
Killed in action between 6 May 1915 - 10 May 1915, Gallipoli
Aged 23
Remembered on Twelve Tree Copse (New Zealand) Memorial, Twelve Tree Copse Cemetery, Helles, Turkey

Augustus Alfred Tegner - 11/154
Embarked 16 October 1914, Wellington Mounted Rifles 
Died on service, suicide, 6 March 1918, Mesopotamia
Buried at Baghdad (North Gate) War Cemetery, Waziriah Area of the Al-Russafa district, Baghdad, Iraq


Francis Darbyshire Twistleton - 11/158
Embarked 16 October 1914, Wellington Mounted Rifles 
Killed in Action 9 August 1915, Wellington Mounted Rifles, aged 26
Remembered on Chunuk Bair (New Zealand) Memorial, Chunuk Bair Cemetery, Gallipoli, Turkey





Charles Watt - 11/165 
 Embarked 16 October 1914, Wellington Mounted Rifles 
Killed in Action 30 May 1915, Gallipoli, aged 34
Remembered on Lone Pine Memorial, Lone Pine Cemetery, Anzac, Turkey


Photos sourced from Auckland Museum Cenotaph database
http://muse.aucklandmuseum.com/databases/Cenotaph/locations.aspx?  

Wednesday, October 15, 2014

2nd Lieutenant Andrew Stevenson Thompson - Howick Memorial


 

Andrew Thompson was born in Auckland the son of Andrew Stevenson Thompson and Mary Jane Thompson farmers of Pakuranga.  He was educated at Glenmore School in Pakuranga and at the time of enlisting was working on the family farm. 

He embarked as a sergeant with the Main Body on 16 October 1914 attached to the Auckland Infantry Battalion.  He served through the Gallipoli Campaign being wounded there in July 1915.  He earned himself a commission and was promoted to 2nd Lieutenant on 24 May 1917.  Serving in France he was awarded twice for his actions, firstly with a M.S.M. (Meritorious Service Medal) during the First Somme in 1916 and secondly, he was M.I.D. (Mentioned in Dispatches) for actions he took on 13 June 1917.  His citations are below:
 
Meritorious Service Medal - London Gazette, 1 January 1917, p55, Rec No 494: "For gallantry and devotion to duty. He was wounded near Flers on September 27th 1916, while endeavouring to obtain some information on the situation at a certain place, that was urgently wanted. During the whole time he has been with the Battalion he has done consistently good work."

Mentioned in Despatches - London Gazette, 28 December 1917, p13575, Rec No 1119: "On the 13th June 1917, when the situation was very obscure he boldly led his patrol into the enemy's sector under heavy fire of all calibers, obtained and sent back very useful information, established and held an important position against strong bombing attacks until reinforced, thereby ensuring the success of subsequent operations that day. He has at all times done excellent work and shown a splendid example of devotion to duty."


Six weeks later Lieutenant Thompson was with the Auckland Infantry Regiment, 3rd Battalion when he was killed in action on 4 August 1917.  After being wounded twice his luck had sadly run out.

 
Colonist, Volume LVIII, Issue 14534, 11 October 1917