Friday, September 12, 2014

War News - 12 September 1914



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Evening Post, Volume LXXXVIII, 12 September 1914


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Press, Volume L, Issue 15071, 12 September 1914

Wednesday, September 10, 2014

Corporal Edward St George - Bulls Memorial


 
In Memoriam, 1914-1918 [Wanganui Collegiate School], Wanganui Chronicle Co. Ltd.

Edward St George Gorton known as Jack was the youngest son of the late Lieutenant Colonel Edward and Nora Mary Stephenson Gorton.   Born in 1881 he was educated along with his brothers at Wanganui Collegiate School.  In 1902 he headed to Argentina to join his brother where they both ran large farms from which they hoped to make their fortune before eventually returning to New Zealand.  At the outbreak of war and Jack quickly left Argentina and headed for Britain where he enlisted with the New Zealand Engineers.

He embarked for Gallipoli on 12 April 1915 where he was wounded on 16 May 1915 receiving shrapnel wounds to his back and right arm.  After being hospitalised in Alexandria and Cairo he returned to Gallipoli in August 1915.  Whilst recovering from his wounds he would have received the sad news of the death of his brother Denis in Buenos Aires.  Jack distinguished himself in Gallipoli and is mentioned in the records.

After the evacuation from Gallipoli he served on the Western Front with the Engineers where he was killed in action on 11 January 1918 he is buried at Ypres Reservoir Cemetery, Ieper, Belgium, he was 37 years old.  Below is a extract from In Memoriam, 1914-1918, Wanganui Collegiate School:
 
The evening before his death he received instructions to leave for a commission in England, but asked permission to go out and finish a job he had not completed. While doing this he was instantly killed by a shell. He was in the Engineers and very keen on his work. Had he been a little less so he would in all probability be alive today. 

War News - 10 September 1914




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Hunterville Memorial - Whanganui




Monday, September 8, 2014

Walter Tull, the first black officer in the British army, to feature on £5 coin - The Guardian


Walter tull trail
Walter Tull at Tottenham. Photograph: Michaela Morgany by Micahel
The first black officer in the British Army will be remembered on a special set of coins released by the Royal Mint as part of commemorations of the centenary of the first world war.
http://www.theguardian.com/world/2014/sep/03/walter-tull-first-black-officer-british-army-coin

War News - 8 September 1914

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Marlborough Express, Volume XLVIII, Issue 211, 8 September 1914

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Press, Volume L, Issue 15067, 8 September 1914

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Press, Volume L, Issue 15067, 8 September 1914

 


Rifleman Cecil Albert Duff - Bulls Memorial


 

At the time of enlisting in January 1916, Cecil Duff was employed at the Eltham dairy factory as a cheese factory hand.  Cecil was the second son of Elizabeth Eleanor Duff, of Bulls, and the late David James Duff, born in Wellington in April 1885.

Before embarking Cecil needed treatment on his teeth which was carried out at Featherston camp. The treatment required a general anesthetic and Cecil was confused with another soldier who had died at the hospital whilst undergoing treatment.  Cecil's mother received a telegram informing her that her son had died while undergoing the treatment.  When a cousin went to view what he assumed would be Cecil's body he was surprised to find Cecil alive.  Cecil's mother (Elizabeth) on hearing the news that her son was still alive and well must have been overjoyed.

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Poverty Bay Herald, Volume XLIII, Issue 13936, 8 March 1916

Cecil finally embarked on 1 April 1916 with the 2nd Reinforcements attached to the New Zealand Rifle Brigade.  Sadly Elizabeth would receive another telegram some months later in 1916 informing her that her son had been killed in action on 15 September 1916 at the Somme and this time there was no mistake.  His body was never identified and he is remembered on the Caterpillar Valley (New Zealand) Memorial, Caterpillar Valley Cemetery, Longueval, Somme, France.

Cecil's younger brother Bert also enlisted and embarked with the Wellington Infantry Battalion.  On enlisting he was given a clean bill of health, however soon after arrival in England he had a re-occurrence of Rheumatic fever which he had contracted years early.  From what I can tell he never made it to the front and was discharged from the army no longer fit for duty returning to New Zealand in May 1917.

Thursday, September 4, 2014

War News - 4 September 1914


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Ashburton Guardian, Volume XXXIII, Issue 8934, 4 September 1914


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Marlborough Express, Volume XLVIII, Issue 208, 4 September 1914


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Northern Advocate , 4 September 1914


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Sun, Volume I, Issue 180, 4 September 1914